Life of Pasteur

Louis Pasteur, the Father of Immunology?

Pasteur conducting germ theory experiment in his laboratory

Originally published April 10, 2012 by the US National Library of Medicine INTRODUCTION As a student of immunology, I learned that Louis Pasteur was really the father of immunology, despite Edward Jenner’s pioneering introduction of vaccination to prevent smallpox in 1798 (Smith, 2011). Although successful, Jenner’s experiments led to no understanding as to how immunity develops. By comparison, in addition ...

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Pasteur: High Priest of Microbiology

Pasteur, Metschnikov, and the four boys from Newark treated for rabies

Wherever he turned, Pasteur brought great insight to benefit humanity Robert I. Krasner, 1995 This year marks the centennial of Louis Pasteur’s death, occasioning a series of events organized by UNESCO and the Pasteur Institute to celebrate his many contributions. When one thinks of the famous names associated with the history of medical science, certainly Pasteur ranks among the greatest. ...

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Recent Research on Louis Pasteur’s Connections with the Fine Arts

Pasteur: Dessins et Pastels

by Bert Hansen, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of History Baruch College of CUNY It has long been known that Louis Pasteur (1822-1895) took art lessons as a teenager. About thirty of his drawings, pastels, and lithographs have survived. Most of them are portraits of family, friends, and people in his town. But he stopped this work at age nineteen, and as ...

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Virchow and Pasteur

Rudolf Virchow

Originally published in The Journal of the American Medical Association, Volume 57, Number 15, 1911, p. 1225 To the Editor: –All those who relish rich and lofty natures, great characters who have marked their impress on a whole generation, and left of their passage a trace that time shall not obliterate, will have read with interest and emotion your editorial ...

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Pasteur’s Life and Labors

Louis Pasteur Portrait - Published in The American Magazine in 1886

Originally published in The American Magazine, Volume 22, July to December 1886, pp.341-349 Of Pasteur’s life, apart from his work, but little is to be said; for his life is emphatically his work. A normally idle and pleasure-loving childhood passed into an adolescence of rare industry and a maturity of entire self-devotion; and the truant schoolboy developed into a Scientific ...

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The Druggist: Louis Pasteur Biography

Louis Pasteur Portrait - published in The Druggist in 1884

Article originally posted in The Druggist, Volume 6, 1884, p. 8 Louis Pasteur, the distinguished chemist, whose portrait is this month presented to the readers of The Druggist, was born at Dole, in the Department of Jura, in 1822. He entered the College of Besaucon as an usher at the age of eighteen, and three years later became a pupil ...

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Success of Pasteur’s Treatment of Hydrophobia

American Druggist - Volume 17 - 1889

Originally printed in the American Druggist: A Weekly Illustrated Journal of Practical Pharmacy in September, 1889 At the Academy of Sciences, M. Pasteur recently presented a note of the results observed in the Pasteur Institute from May 1st 1888, to May 1st 1889 (La France Médicale, No. 73). During this period, 1,673 persons bitten by rabid, or presumably (très suspects ...

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How Pasteur Made Nursing Better

19th Century French Nursing

One of the most common occupations in health care is the registered nurse. Registered nurses provide a wide variety of services to patients. They also work very closely with other medical professionals to diagnose patients and assist with treatment. Many of the discoveries of Louis Pasteur related to disease and germ theory revolutionized the nursing and surgical occupations. 19th Century ...

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